Connect with us

Health

Death cases at nursing homes go past 3,300 in an alarming rise

mm

Published

on

Over 3,000 deaths in New York have been associated with coronavirus outbreaks across care facilities and nursing homes, an alarming increase in the last two weeks, as per the latest calculations made by The Associated Press. 

As a figure hasn’t been released by the federal government, The Associated Press has been running its own tally based upon media reports as well as state health departments. The recent count of about 3,232 deaths in the state is an increase from around 450 death case just ten days ago. 

However, the correct death toll among the 1mn mostly elderly and frail people who reside in these facilities is probably higher, say, experts, as most of the state counts do not include the ones who passed away without being tested for coronavirus ever.

The outbreaks in the last couple of weeks include 1 at a Richmond nursing home, which has claimed the life of 42 people and infected over 100. Meanwhile, another nursing home in Indiana has claimed the life of 24 people and has infected 16. This comes a few weeks post a coronavirus outbreak at one nursing home located in Seattle’s Kirkland area, which has claimed the lives of 43 people so far.

These are just the COVID-19 outbreaks that are known to the officials. Most of the states offer only overall figures of the deaths at nursing homes and do not provide further details on specific outbreaks. The most notable state among all is the country’s leader, New York that has recorded 1880 deaths at nursing homes of around 96,000 residents. However, the state has refused to detail particular outbreaks over privacy concerns. 

As per the experts, the deaths at nursing homes might keep increasing due to the chronic staffing shortages which have now worsened due to the coronavirus pandemic, a lack of protective gear and as well as continued absence of available COVID-19 testing. 

Moreover, the death cases have risen despite the steps undertaken by the fed government in the mid of March. These include a ban on visitors, suspension of group activities and the requirement of every worker to be tested for respiratory symptoms or fever at each shift. 

However, a report by The Associated Press previously this month discovered that the infections were still continuing to spread in the nursing homes as these tests did not catch individuals who had been infected but were asymptomatic. Many massive outbreaks had been blamed for being spreaders of the disease, including the infected healthcare workers who were working 24/7 at different nursing homes.

Anthony Ha is a senior writer at ELISA Kit News, where he covers media and advertising and co-hosts the Original Content podcast. Previously, he worked as a tech writer at Adweek, a senior editor at the tech blog VentureBeat, and a local government reporter at the Hollister Free Lance. He lives in New York City. Contact Email: anthony@elisakitnews.net Twitter: https://twitter.com/anthonyha Phone: 720.213.5854

Health

Coronavirus resurgence is likely in 2024, says a Harvard study

mm

Published

on

Social distancing might be needed until the year 2022 to avoid critical healthcare capacities from getting exceeded, says a new study from Harvard University, as more COVID-19 patients get hospitalized in the ICUs.

Even in case of apparent elimination, there is a need to maintain SARS-CoV-2 surveillance as a resurgence might be possible by the year 2024, say the researchers of the study.

There is an urgent need to take appropriate measures to tackle the present pandemic. Pharmaceutical treatments and vaccines might need months or years to create and test, said the researchers with the sole way to combat the disease being non-pharmaceutical developments. 

As per the researchers, SARS-CoV-2, which is the virus that is causing the fatal disease, has the power to produce a considerable outbreak regardless of what season it is. 

The findings of the study showed that the outbreaks established during winter-spring, such as the one causing the present coronavirus pandemic, generally have low peaks. Meanwhile, the ones occurring during autumn-winter are more acute, said the researchers. 

It is still being learned whether individuals who once contract the disease would be immune to coronavirus permanently. If the immunity to stay protected from the virus isn’t permanent, it’s likely to enter in the regular circulation, just like the flu pandemic, as per the study.

The COVID-19 mortality rate, as of Wednesday, stands at 6.4 percent, with almost 127,000 deaths of about 2 million confirmed cases. Comparatively, the flu mortality rate in the country stood at 0.096 percent during the 2018-19 seasons, as per the CDC, being almost 67 times lesser than coronavirus. 

A study published by the CDC in the year 2006 estimates mortality of Spanish flu to stand at 10 to 20 percent. Lary Brilliant, an epidemiologist who worked along with the WHO to help eliminate smallpox, said in March that mortality rate was 2 to 10 percent during the 1918-19 pandemic. 

As per the researchers from Harvard, even if the SARS-CoV-2 immunity would last only for 2 years, moderate, 30 percent immunity from the other strands of coronavirus which generally cause cold might eliminate its transfer up till 3 years effectively.  

Even in the event of the virus appearing to have died down, say the researchers, a resurgence is still likely in the year 2024. As per the researchers, a long-standing immunity, which can be attained by vaccination, can possibly result in the elimination of coronavirus. 

The Harvard study appears in the journal Science.

Continue Reading

Health

New York to begin reporting probable deaths due to coronavirus to CDC

mm

Published

on

On Wednesday, the Governor of New York, Andrew Cuomo, said that the US state would start reporting probable deaths due to coronavirus to the CDC as the country struggles on how to count the increasing mortality rate while there’s still minimal testing. 

In his statement, Cuomo said that New York would rationalize these new reporting guidelines with the local governments as well as get that data out as quickly as possible. 

Besides, the state would get in touch with the nursing facilities and homes as well to learn whether any other individuals lost their lives due to coronavirus, but weren’t in nursing homes or hospitals necessarily at that time, said Cuomo.

Cuomo believes that there might be additional individuals who have died and were not included in the death count as they were not hospitalized, so the new measure will go through that. 

As of Wednesday, there were over 213,000 known coronavirus positive cases in New York, with over 11,500 confirmed death cases. However, that doesn’t include several probable deaths that NYC began reporting during this week. 

On Tuesday, the city reported over 111,400 known positive coronavirus cases, with around 6,840 known death cases and about 4,059 probable death cases. 

Bill de Blasio, the Mayor of NYC on Wednesday, said that he believes reporting the no. of probable coronavirus deaths was significant to showcase the sheer totality and bigger reality of the pandemic. 

The city has also released data that shows there were around 8,184 death cases from 11 March to 13 April, which weren’t known as probable or confirmed cases. 

When asked about the figures on Wednesday, Dr. Oxiris Barbot, the NYC Health Department’s commissioner, said the sad reality is there’ve been individuals who have lost lives directly or indirectly due to coronavirus. 

Barbot said it was essential to compare the over 8,000 deaths with the no. of deaths recorded through the same time the previous year. She said that only time could tell what those no. really meant. For instance, a few deaths could have been recorded as being caused due to heart strokes as people hadn’t yet developed the symptoms of coronavirus when they otherwise should’ve been counted as apparent coronavirus victims, said Barbot.

On Tuesday, Barbot, in a statement made to NBC News related to probable death count, said that the state is now focused on making sure that each New York resident who passed away due to coronavirus gets counted. 

Continue Reading

Health

Taste and smell loss is associated with coronavirus, says a new UC San Diego health study

mm

Published

on

The loss of taste and smell so far has just anecdotally been associated with coronavirus so far, but a new study reveals the first-ever correlation between the disease and sensory loss. 

The study, conducted by the researchers from UC San Diego Health, shows that individuals who have taste and smell loss had their chances of contracting coronavirus increased by ten times. 

The findings of the study support the need to stay aware of the taste and smell loss as early symptoms of the virus, said the researchers. These conclusions were based upon the patients who weren’t hospitalized for coronavirus. 

Fever continues to remain the first symptom of COVID-19, but the loss of taste and smell, as well as fatigue, also followed as the initial symptoms often. 

As per otolaryngologist, Carol Yan from the UC San Diego Health, majority individuals were experiencing improvements within 2 to 3 weeks, and that is hugely reassuring for every one of those who have taste and smell loss. 

Ken Ramirez from Ranco Penasquitos, who had lost all sense of taste and smell, is recovering steadily from the disease. He says that his experience supports the study findings and that the information is extremely useful for those who are witnessing similar symptoms. If anything like this happens to anyone, they should realize that it is unique to coronavirus, said Ramirez.

For the study, the researchers from UC San Diego Health involved 1,480 patients who had symptoms similar to flu as well as concerns regarding possible coronavirus infection. They underwent testing at the health system starting from 3rd March till 29th March. Of the volunteers who participated, 102 tested positive for coronavirus, while 1,378 participants tested negative.  

As per a media release issued by the UC San Diego Health, the study involved responses from 203 coronavirus negative patients and 59 coronavirus positive patients. It discovered that 68 percent of the 59 patients reported taste loss while 17 percent of the 203 patients reported taste loss and 16 percent reported smell loss. 

The researchers also discovered that the patients who said they had sore throat tested coronavirus negative often. 

Dr. Yan hopes that the study will pose a worldwide impact and will promote further research on taste and smell loss. She is also hopeful that it will raise awareness so that sensory impairment gets included as a regular screening measure. 

The study appears in the medical journal Forum of Allergy and Rhinology. 

Continue Reading

Trending